Jane Freilicher @ Paul Kasmin Gallery

Jane Freilicher, Peonies on a Table, 1954 (courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery)
Jane Freilicher, Peonies on a Table, 1954 (courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery)

Julia Felsenthal write about painter Jane Freilicher. A show of Jane Freilicher's work, '50s New York, is on view at Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York, through June 9, 2018.

Felsenthal notes that Freilicher was "committed ... to rooting her practice in the everyday ... Domestic spaces were her creative fodder; domestication was not ('she had no love for Tupperware,' [Elizabeth] Hazan clarifies). Per [Eric] Brown, she was adept at a balancing act: maintaining her foothold at the very center of the art world, and simultaneously keeping a 'healthy distance from it.' Freilicher was self-deprecating. ('I paint the way I do because I have no imagination,' she kidded, a characteristic deflection), unconcerned with popularity (how else would one become a landscape painter in an era of muscular Abstract Expressionism?), and somewhat allergic to fame-seeking ('to strain after innovation, to worry about being on "the cutting edge" . . . reflects a concern for a place in history or one’s career rather than the authenticity of one’s painting')."

via: 
Vogue