Fritz Bultman: The Missing Irascible

Fritz Bultman, Hotter, 1962, oil on canvas, 30 x 24 inches (courtesy of Edelman
Fritz Bultman, Hotter, 1962, oil on canvas, 30 x 24 inches (courtesy of Edelman Arts)

Jason Andrew reviews the exhibition Fritz Bultman: The Missing Irascible at Edelman Arts, New York, on view through May 11, 2013.

Andrew writes that "For Bultman, who unfortunately missed his photo-op as one of 'The Irascibles' (the group of Abstract Expressionist painters made famous by a 1951 photograph in Life magazine), the paradox in painting was bridging nature and art... Bultman recalls watching the burning of the swamps in the delta as a young boy. 'What appears to be a sheet of water will be burning with very high flames against a blue sky,' adding that he found the sight, 'terribly exciting. I don’t know anything else that seems to me as beautiful as that […] It’s fire and water. You very seldom see them together in such close juxtaposition as you do when they are burning a swamp.' ...To Bultman, nature was not only tangibly seen and touched, but also felt in one’s heart and head. Art was the interpretation or record of the pulse and rhythm of the human condition."