Liubov Popova, an Homage

Liubov Popova, Untitled, (c.1915), oil on canvas, 41 7/8 x 28 inches (Solomon R.
Liubov Popova, Untitled, (c.1915), oil on canvas, 41 7/8 x 28 inches (Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York Gift, George Costakis, 1981 - image © Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum)

Joyce Kozloff considers the work of Liubov Popova.

Kozloff writes: "After the passage of a full century, shouldn’t we recognize the uniqueness of a [Varvara] Stepanova or [Nadezhda] Udaltsova as readily as we do with [an Alexander] Rodchenko or El Lissitzky? Over the years, I have returned again and again to Liubov Popova, whose art resonates for me, and so I am writing about her now, as a fan, hoping that others will write about her peers as singular figures in the history of modern art... Popova’s breakthrough 'Space-Force Constructions' of 1920 ... remain her most innovative works. They perfectly encompass her five principles: painterly space; line; color; 'energetics'; and texture. She had tackled space in her Cubist period, color in her Suprematist period, and energy in her Futurist period. Finally, line and texture moved to the forefront. There was much discussion of faktura (the physicality of surface) as content. Popova’s mixed media, non-objective paintings on wood met these conditions gracefully. Lines zigzag across their surfaces, weaving in and out of patches of color, breaking up and crossing, some in concentric circles, others zooming upwards in parallel formation toward a cosmic unknown, and still others ripping diagonally through hovering shapes and shadows."