Mario Correa: In Conversation

Mario Correa, Through Shavings and Dust, 2012, oil and enamel on canvas, 76.75 x
Mario Correa, Through Shavings and Dust, 2012, oil and enamel on canvas, 76.75 x 53.5 inches (courtesy of Redling Fine Art)

An extended correspondence between Geoff Tuck and painter Mario Correa on the occasion of Correa's recent exhibition at Redling Fine Art, Los Angeles.

Correa remarks: "Though much of my recent work has utilized print making techniques, I don’t have any training or expertise in printmaking; what I like about it is it’s physicality (I print by hand) and I like to think that my naivete allows for some diy ingenuity, or wrongness in printmaking can make rightness in painting… I’ve got a group of paintings made by painting on wine bottles and then wrapping and wringing canvas over them, and another group is made by painting through a blank silk screen, the screen clogs as I go, making it’s own marks until its no longer useful. You asked who figured as precedents in this way of working, I would say Sigmar Polke, Llyn Foulkes (Foulkes’ show at the Hammer is great), and Lari Pitman were my first heroes for unconventional painting processes, then Christopher Wool was a gateway to many more… Simon Hantai and David Hammons got me thinking about prints… they all have a unique relationship to the artist’s hand, it’s there and not there."