Donald Judd & Giorgio Morandi: Simple Forms & Depth of Feeling

Giorgio Morandi, Natura morta (Still Life), 1962, oil on canvas, 12 3/16 x 14 3/
Giorgio Morandi, Natura morta (Still Life), 1962, oil on canvas, 12 3/16 x 14 3/16 inches (Private Collection © 2015 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome)

Altoon Sultan blogs about two exhibitions currently on view at David Zwirner Gallery, New York: Giorgio Morandi and Donald Judd (both on view through December 19).

Sultan writes that at the Judd show: "Here was work that was intensely formal––about shape and dimension and repetition and balance and weight and color––that was so beautiful in its clarity and reserve that I was deeply touched. ... Walking upstairs ... where a beautiful show of Morandi paintings and prints was hanging, I was struck by a similarity of concerns for the two artists. Although Morandi's forms aren't minimalist, he painted the same simple objects again and again in different configurations, playing with basic ideas of relationships of form and space and color. Whether the objects are in a line at the front edge of a table or compressed against its outer edge, I feel that the things depicted are more than just studio props; they become, like the Judd sculpture, essential forms, touching on transcending the ordinary."