Deborah Brown: A Painterly Trajectory

Deborah Brown, Marquise, 2014, oil on canvas, 70 X 80 inches (courtesy of the ar
Deborah Brown, Marquise, 2014, oil on canvas, 70 X 80 inches (courtesy of the artist)

Sharon Butler posts an essay on the work of Deborah Brown by Paul D'Agostino, written for the exhibition Deborah Brown: Recent Paintings, curated by Matthew Neil Gehring at the Flecker Gallery at Suffolk Community College, Selden, New York. (through October 17, 2014).

D'Agostino concludes: "Infused with formal freeness, informed by freedom of imagination, embellished with brushy movement and broadly delightful palettes, Brown’s explorations into the pictorial and sculptural canon of art history are also, like Friedrich’s Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog, self-aware. They are artworks about artworks, about painting’s potencies and potential, about its material reach. They are, like Friedrich’s hiker posing momentarily in a mountainous midst, both historically stilled and pictorially astir. Much like Friedrich’s work, moreover, Brown’s new paintings are about looking, observing, ingesting, encompassing. In the vast landscape of artworks that reside in her mind, Brown is perhaps that wanderer. The pictorial peak she has reached, where she pauses with an awed beholder’s inspired eyes, whistles and whirls with pensive echoes and reflective pride."