René Daniëls

René Daniëls, The Battle for the Twentieth Century, 1984, oil on canvas, 100 by
René Daniëls, The Battle for the Twentieth Century, 1984, oil on canvas, 100 by 120 cm

As part of his series about under-known artists, Raphael Rubinstein profiles the paintings of René Daniëls.

Rubinstein writes: "From today's perspective, Daniëls's points of reference and conscious influences seem impeccable: Polke, Broodthaers, Magritte's periode vache. But we shouldn’t forget how unlikely these choices were for a young painter in the late 1970s. Also worth noting are his frequent literary references. The Venal Muse, a title given to innocuous looking early paintings (1979) of swans and mussels, is borrowed from a Baudelaire poem depicting his muse (and, by implication the poet) as a prostitute. In 1984, Daniëls painted a marvelous big imaginary portrait of Guillaume Apollinaire in a bowler hat with an artist’s sketchbook under his arm. Adding poetry to Rasuchenberg’s formula, Daniëls once admitted to 'using the former no-man’s-land between literature, the visual arts and life.' "

via: 
The Silo