Denise Green: Studio Visit

Denise Green, Evanescence (Red), 2007, Wax crayon, pencil, marble dust and acryl
Denise Green, Evanescence (Red), 2007, Wax crayon, pencil, marble dust and acrylic on canvas, 72 x 144 inches (courtesy of the artist and Sundaram Tagore Gallery)

Jonathan Goodman talks with painter Denise Green on the occasion of the publication of Denise Green: An Artist's Odyssey from the University of Minnesota Press.

"In the beginning of the 1980s... I was supporting a new style of painting, one that turned away from the forms of representation in art. So my style changed significantly. My versions of houses, chairs, and vessels were flattened and reduced to their essence, without sharp detail. I set the imagery into a background of single color. Critics understood my style as an innovative approach because it combined abstraction and representation on equal terms. Yet even before these paintings were shown, I felt myself drawn in another direction. I had been reading the French theorists Barthes, Deleuze and Guattari, the consequence of which was that figuration was gradually abandoned in my painting. Instead, I favored abstract markings, dots, lines and grids. Shadowy outlines of figures and furniture gave way to ciphers and linear markings whose meanings were multivalent and indefinite."