Paula Modersohn-Becker

Paula Modersohn-Becker, Portrait de jeune fille, les doigts écartés devant la poitrine, c. 1905, tempera on canvas, 41 x 33 cm (Von der Heydt-Museum, Wuppertal, © Paula-Modersohn-Becker-Stiftung, Brême)
Paula Modersohn-Becker, Portrait de jeune fille, les doigts écartés devant la poitrine, c. 1905, tempera on canvas, 41 x 33 cm (Von der Heydt-Museum, Wuppertal, © Paula-Modersohn-Becker-Stiftung, Brême)

Anna McNay reviews the recent exhibition of works by Paula Modersohn-Becker at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris.

McNay writes: "[Modersohn-Becker's] short but highly fertile career – she produced more than 700 paintings in seven years (1900-07), working seven days a week, 'with a passion that excludes everything else' – took place at a pivotal point in art history, and her trajectory from strict en plein air realism to a stylised, simplified manner, influenced and directed by her numerous stays in Paris, captures aspects of many of the movements of the time, while repeating personal themes and motifs to create a recognisable and cohesive oeuvre very much her own."