Charles Demuth's Watercolors

Charles Demuth, The Masque of the Red Death, c. 1918, watercolor and graphite on
Charles Demuth, The Masque of the Red Death, c. 1918, watercolor and graphite on wove paper 8 x 11 1/8 inches (© 2012 The Barnes Foundation)

Jacob Feige writes about discovering a room of Charles Demuth's watercolors at the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia.

Feige writes: "Easily missed and slightly out of place, these small gems of color and bygone entertainment are endearingly awkward, full of a strange anemic energy; they are a rare note of levity in an otherwise fairly stern collection. Nearly a hundred years on, Demuth’s watercolors from this period express gender and sexuality in ways that are now an essential aspect of contemporary art practice. The physicality of bodies, androgyny, and abstraction inform one another as they do in works by Kai Althoff and Leidy Churchman, contemporary artists whose projects take on such issues in direct lineage of Demuth."