Curt Barnes on Morris Louis

Morris Louis, Point of Tranquility, 1960, acrylic (Magma) on raw cotton duck canvas, 102 x 136 inches (Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden)
Morris Louis, Point of Tranquility, 1960, acrylic (Magma) on raw cotton duck canvas, 102 x 136 inches (Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden)

Curt Barnes writes about painter Morris Louis.

Barnes writes that although Pollock and Frankenthaler made great achievements in "painting as phenomenon," Louis "remains the most vivid for me. The usually monumental size of his work could suggest a towering ego, yet somehow it needs to fill your field of vision, occupy an entire wall to achieve its full meaning. Moreover, the technique he used suggests humility: he seemed to be sharing with us—look what I found!—rather than trying to impress us with the product of his patented ingenuity. And even that 'I' is often absent; when I see his work, he’s initially not there at all, even to call forth associations with his other work. I confront sensation for its own sake."